5 surprising insights on earning more money

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Sound familiar?

The conventional wisdom goes like this: Keep a budget, save 10% of your income, don’t spend on any extravagances (especially not lattes, the most evil of all), invest your money (where? oh, you know…just “invest it”), don’t use credit cards, and buy a house because it’s a “good investment.” And somehow, someday, you’ll be financially secure. Not rich, just okay.

Never mind that few people have the skills or discipline to save 10% of their income. Never mind that each of those recommendations depends on willpower, which lasts for a month or two, then dissipates as predictably as the effects of diets. Never mind that credit is essential and can save you over $100,000 on the purchase of an average house.

I Will Teach You To Be Rich readers know that those “tips” are filled with so many holes that it’s almost difficult to believe — chiefly human psychology. This is why you’ll have a friend whose new resolution (every month) is to stop spending money and really save! This nearly always fails — just like diets — because behavioral change is extraordinarily challenging and few people study how it actually works.

Yet “experts” continue spouting off this nonsense of saving and trying harder through sheer force alone. Why? Because it’s easy to write, inoffensive, produces pageviews, and requires very little energy from a largely apathetic and semi–financially-conscious public. Real behavioral change takes systems, not simply willpower. Real behavioral change requires conscious spending, not across-the-board cost-cutting.

For example, the ordinary wisdom of “stop wasting your money on stuff” is filled with outdated cliches like encouraging us to stop spending on lattes, eating out, and bars — all things that people in their 20s and 30s spend money on as a natural part of life. Even more importantly, we’re all embedded in a social system that reinforces this spending, making it virtually impossible to cut down discretionary expenses by willpower alone. This is like telling teens to stop having sex: You can try, and it may make you feel better to say it, but that’s not going to change the actual numbers. (Exception: My future kids, who I will lock down with one ankle chain each, like an elephant.)

Today, we’re over halfway into 2010, and I want to check in with you on where you are with your finances.

If I’d followed the advice of most “experts,” I “should” have done the following this year: Stopped eating out, cooked at home every day, never take a vacation, sit at home (no cable) and knit, reuse plastic bags 47 times, cut down on the amount of toilet paper I use, walk everywhere (no cabs or driving), and on and on. Who the hell in their 20s and 30s wants to live like that?

In fact, based on some back-of-the-reused napkin math, all I have to do is use 50 fewer squares of toilet paper each day, which will save me $2.35/month, times TWELVE MONTHS!! I WILL TEACH MYSELF TO BE RICH!!!

Instead, after automating my finances, I’ve decided to earn more. In fact, in one hour this year, I earned 10x what I recently earned in an entire year.

Many people are spending the summer being lazy, watching The Hills, and drinking themselves into a Chico State-inspired stupor.

Screw them. You’re going to crush them like a dump truck.

Let me show you what I’ve learned recently. Then I’ll tell you what’s coming your way.

The case of the confused man

Two weeks ago, I get this email from someone who’s unsubscribing from my newsletter. Now, every time someone unsubscribes, I get an email with their reason, and I usually reply to most of them just to see why they’re leaving.

This guy says he “already knows all the basic stuff” I write about. Whenever I read this, it’s usually a tipoff that you’ve got someone who’s more interested in finding newer and newer material (!!) instead of actually doing something. Anyway, I decide to ask a few more questions.

Ramit: “What kind of material would you be interested in?”
Guy: “I have done the basics. I am looking for ways to grow my money substantially, high-risk investing, take a vacation. I am looking for a stronger background in finance.”
Ramit: “Have you done [XYZ]“?
Guy: “Yes, I have done all that.”
Ramit: “Would you be interested in earning more?”
Guy: “Yes, I would but its all scam material out there. Any way to earn more would be appreciated.”

My first thought was, HOLY SHIT, I spent all of January writing all-new material on earning more. How could he not know? But in retrospect, it’s my fault: Why should I expect him to know about it? Honestly, I haven’t talked much about earning more since then, even though I announced that 2010 is the year of earning more. And then, as I searched my email and survey responses, I found more and more people asking for material on earning more and quitting their jobs to do something better.

So, oops… I can’t believe I haven’t shared what my team and I have been doing behind the scenes for the last 4 months: creating hours and hours of audio/video material, case studies, new techniques to earn more, and capturing tons of stories about people earning more.

My fault for not sharing. So I’m going to spend the next 4 weeks giving you a bunch of free stuff that you can use to take action right now to earn more — and use the money to quit your job, fly to Vegas, pay off debt, or whatever else you want to consciously do.

Why earning instead of cutting back?

I like to focus on earning more instead of cutting back for a few reasons that make a profound difference in living a rich life.

There’s a limit to how much you can cut back, but no limit to how much you can earn. In fact, as you cut back on spending, it gets increasingly harder, but as you earn more, it gets increasingly easier. For example, one of my students is earning several thousand dollars more per month. Let’s say he makes a small 10% tweak (say, a phrase he uses in his pricing negotiations, or the way he presents his guarantee, or even the customers he pursues). At his scale, that small tweak alone can be worth hundreds of dollars per month.

Cutting back on everything really sucks. Really, when you read some of these judgmental people who think it’s unconscionable to spend a little money on a nice dinner or trip or shirt…don’t you wonder, who really wants to live like that? Let’s assume you want an extra $1,000/month in your bank account. Let’s compare what you’d have to SAVE vs. what you’d have to EARN.

  • Saving: No eating out, cancel gym, cancel cable, no going out, reduce cellphone minutes…etc.
  • Earning more: Spend 4 weeks testing ideas rapidly (these could be anything you’re good at, including dog walking, organizing, writing, singing, high-school math, programming…), spend 4 more weeks developing your service offering, testing it in an iterative fashion, then identifying 50 leads, qualifying, and pitching them. If you get 1 client, you have $1,000/month. That’s about 5 hours/week. And the best part? As long as you continue doing a great job for your client, that money continues flowing in, and you can find more clients to compound your growth.

The point is, if you can earn $50, you can earn $500. And if you can earn $500, you can earn $5,000. For those people who are willing to challenge themselves beyond the simple mantra of “cut back on everything,” there is a lush and rich life waiting for you — not just financially, but also intellectually, because knowing how to earn more money is a skill that applies to so many areas of your life.

Anyone can cut back for a few days. Few can persist. And even fewer can earn money on the side, which is a GOOD thing for you. How often have you gotten gung-ho about saving money, cut back 80% on your spending, then watched it float right back to what it was before? Anyone can make a short-term resolution, but it’s extraordinarily difficult to change behavior for the long term. Since we have limited willpower, I believe we should automate as many basic decisions as possible, and concentrate our limited cognition/willpower on more things like relationships, health, and our work. Also, since we have limited willpower, if you’re going to direct it to your finances, why not pick something that will result in a BIG WIN — something like earning more money?

If you earned just $300/month for 5 years, that’s $18,000. My students know how they can easily earn that much and, since it’s such a modest number, how they can virtually automate that money.

Think bigger. If you earned $1,000/month for 5 years, that’s $60,000. That assumes you don’t increase your income and that you earn more for just for 5 years. You see? When you earn more, it’s in your control — and the numbers are staggering. How many lattes is that worth?

Who wants to wait 40 years to live life? Not me. When you see people taking trips, or maxing out their Roth IRA, or spending consciously however they want…I don’t think to myself, “Waa…I can’t afford that.” I ask myself, “How could I afford that?” That simple shift in the form of the question has a profound effect on your ability to take action.

I’ve heard a lot of people say something like, “Oh yeah, HE can earn more money on the side because [some reason], but *I* never could.” That is wrong. In fact, as you know I generally hate artists because they are the worst business people in the world. But look at this from one of my students:

“Thanks to you, I’m an artist that’s not starving. Your Earn1K course helped me successfully secure two new corporate accounts (Anthropologie and Takashimaya) in the last month.”
– Julie F.

My new motto is, if an artist can do it, so can you.

In general, people behave conservatively in times of ambiguity. So when faced with the ultra-ambigous idea of earning more, most people create barriers in their mind to justify why earning more is impossible.

  • “How does so-and-so always get to go on those weekend trips / have flexibility / work from home? She’s so lucky”
  • “But I’m a [fill in your job here]… I just CAN’T earn more on the side with my skill set.”
  • “I’m just waiting for a good idea”Now let me share some of the insights I’ve learned that might help you figure out what you could do to earn more money.

    5 surprising insights on earning more money

    Over the last 4 months, I’ve learned a huge amount from over 8,000 data points, including survey responses, individual emails, phone calls, in-person meetings, and webcasts. Here are 5 that stand out.

    1. The #1 barrier to people earning more is finding an idea. Everyone loves the thought of earning $1,000+/month. But when you ask them how they might do it, they suddenly stop, confused about which idea might work — or even guilty that their idea could never be good enough to charge people for. I’ll go into this more over the next few weeks because there is a lot of interesting psychology going on here.
    2. Next, there are several common reasons that people want to earn more. It’s not what you think, either. I initially believed it would be so people could buy a $800 coat or bottle service at a club; in other words, live a baller lifestyle. Not the case. Most people are simply unsatisfied with their job and want the option of eventually quitting and working for themselves, or simply having the option of doing SOMETHING else.Do you guys know people who are a few years out of college and feel like, “Huh…is this it?” Shouldn’t we be meeting CEOs now? Flying around to dispense our wisdom? Seeing huge growth in our salaries, exotic travel, and new ways of thinking all the time? And when you realize it’s not happening — especially in those years between now and having kids — it becomes really disconcerting. What do you do?

      I have a college friend who I went to visit a few months ago. We were catching up on his dating life and he confessed that he was still not doing very well with women. I asked if he’d considered getting some dating advice or taking a course. (I know some people think this is weird, but I think of it as pure self-development.) He thought it was weird too, and he’s actively refused to get advice from anyone more successful with women — but his lack of a dating life was really bothering him. I said ok, and we got quiet for a while. Then I asked, “So you want X but it’s not working. Have you changed anything to get it?” And he looked at me, point-blank, and said, “No, I guess I haven’t.”

      Without changing any behaviors, how can you expect your results to change?

  • Then I learned that more and more people want accountability and smart people around them. They actually openly say, “Yes, I need accountability. I start things but never finish them.” I was surprised to hear how honest people were. Another thing they point out is that often, nobody around them is really motivated to do anything, so they don’t have any support system. More key insights when it comes to earning money. If all your friends are satisfied working at the local insurance company, it becomes “weird” for you to do something different…and that simple social dynamic is enough to dissuade many people from trying something new. We tried to be very careful building in accountability and got comments like this from one of my students named Wendy L.: “This course is probably more valuable than my MBA.”
  • Most importantly, I learned that earning more is NOT about tactic after tactic. I’ve been emphasizing that lately on iwillteachyoutuberich for the readers who are constantly clamoring for more and more new material. In truth, most of them haven’t actually implemented any of the old material, so they simply want new material as a sort of novelty drug, which will give them the illusory feeling of doing something and absolve them of actually having to take action. When it comes to earning money, mindset is also paramount. For example, people HATE calling others to ask or sell something. They just hate it. So even when we showed students that calling someone to get their input on an idea (not selling) would immensely help them earn more, people were extremely hesitant. They would ask for examples, scripts, and all kinds of other things so they wouldn’t have to call. But my most successful students overcame their natural tendency to avoid the phone, stretched themselves to build this new skill, and earned a TON of money on the side.You know people like this: They have some kind of mental barrier and no matter what you suggest, they have an excuse ready to counter everything. I knew a guy in college who HATED going out. I’d say, “Well, what about this bar? What about this restaurant? Want to see a movie? What about go-kart racing dude.” And to each suggestion, he would have some kind of excuse. The problem was not the suggestion. The problem was a mental barrier. And by the way, yes, I realize it sounds like I was trying to date this guy.
  • I learned that more than ever, systems are important. I can tell people the 75 things I did to earn more money, but unless it’s in a carefully constructed system that people can go through and understand which part affects the other parts, it’s pointless. Systems matter. Here’s what one of my students said:

    “Before [you helped me earn more money], I was wasting time shotgunning résumés, writing cover letters, making shitty portfolios, making robots from scratch, unsolicited engineering design analyses—anything and everything to get a new job.
    I got zero responses. I was an aimless, desperate mess. I was so discouraged and embarrassed that I just played videogames all day.”
    –Eugene Y.

    Whether it’s earning more, automating your finances, or trying to lose weight, a system matters far more than simply trying harder.

  • The 6-month check-in

    At the beginning of this year, I told you that this was the year of earning more.

    And one of the insights I listed above was that we WANT someone to hold us accountable. It’s too easy to give up. It’s too easy to settle for doing the same old 9-5 job with a 50-year outlook on retirement. Fuck that. It never gets easier than now.

    Before you run a marathon, it seems impossible to do it. And novices fixate on tactics, like “which shoes should I wear?” But once you’ve completed a marathon, you’ve cracked the code and you realize it’s a mental game. You can do it again anytime if you want. If not, you don’t have to…but at least you know you can. Once you earn your first $500, then $1,000…you can stop there. But if you WANT to earn more…for the rest of your life, you know you can.

    So: Think back to New Year’s Day. January 1, 2010. What were your money resolutions? How much progress have you made?

    Did you want to save more? Get in control of your finances? Learn new skills so you could give yourself the option of eventually quitting your job?

    Let this be a kick in the ass. I’m going to hold you accountable because I know we all need someone to do it.

    3 stories about people who earned more

    I just want to share these short excerpts with you.

    I like this one because it’s so quantitative and funnel-based. This removes all doubt that most people have about “Should I create a Twitter account? FB page? Maybe I should go to a conference…” More on how to do this later.

    “In the first two weeks, after I pitched 229 people by email, I presented to 45 in person, booked 10 consults , took on 4 new clients (I’m 2 for 2 closing consults, 8 out of 10 are scheduled for the next two weeks and two people bought lesson packages directly w/out an additional consult) and have $679 on the books in new revenue as a result. My goal at the start of Earn1k was to get this up to a steady $2,000/mo in private lesson revenue, so with more leads in my funnel to follow up with, I’m feeling great about how this is going to grow.”
    –Dan K.

    This guy earned a $100/hour rate in 2 days. Imagine what his rate will be after he refines his pitch and customer research models.

    “I wanted to tell you this story so you can pass it to the rest of your team at Earn1K. For the past 2 days I have sought out leads on service based business’s with really crappy craigslist ads. I emailed 20 of them each day with a short sales letter I wrote that basically offer them a free 30 min marketing consultation with me and no strings attached.

    I have had 4 people schedule the calls with me via email. During the calls I give them massive value, teaching them about moving the free line, free recorded messages, and finally I provide them with 3 things they can implement right away. I make no mention of my services or cost or anything.

    Each of them has then called me back the next day to ask me to work for them implementing my suggestions… without even asking for a cost! So I threw out $100/hr and they took it!

    I love this course man, thanks to you and your team for all your hard work, I am only into the sample material and module 1 and I have already landed 4 clients and I start working for them today at $100/hour. Thanks for everything, I will have made back my investement in 5 hours of work!”

    –Jordan R.

    This guy earned $10,000:

    “I’m not sure if you’re collecting success stories yet, but I have secured, as of this morning, better than $10,000 in side income over the next two months from one mega client, with prospects to continue with similar compensation. This is up from roughly $100 per month before. I have not only met my goal for the course, but met my goal for the remainder of the year! I owe this success in no small part to the Earn1k course. I think that once I invested my own money (and more than just $50 for a book), that added enough incentive to get off my ass and make things happen. A 2000% return on investment doesn’t seem too bad to me, either, especially considering the course is only about half over.”
    –Ben D.

    When I think about these stories, I want to look at myself in the mirror and lick my own countenance. Seriously, it is awesome to see people stretching and challenging themselves to crack the code of earning more. And now they know they can use those same skills to earn money FOREVER.

    What you should do right now

    Please answer these 3 questions to help get started:

    1. What are your barriers to earning more? (Think deeply…some barriers are buried, like “Only evil people earn money” or “I don’t deserve to earn more”)
    2. Have you started to earn more in the past 6 months?
    3. If not, what’s holding you back?

    Talk to you soon.

* * *
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78 Comments

 
  1. Getting back to the meat of the blog, this is good. This line is classic, I plan on quoting you on it: “Then I asked, “So you want X but it’s not working. Have you changed anything to get it?” And he looked at me, point-blank, and said, “No, I guess I haven’t.”

    Without changing any behaviors, how can you expect your results to change?”

  2. Thanks Ramit, I think this is absolutely accurate. We are very often our own worst enemies, and we just need to understand that anything we *really* want to achieve is possible.

    Looking forward to future posts.

  3. My biggest barrier is finding people to pitch. Or perhaps I know where to find them but I’m afraid to come off as sounding like a used car salesman.

    [Ramit's response: Good insights, Kevin. But those are two different things. Finding people to pitch depends on narrowing your market down and deeply understanding them. Where do they hang out? What do they do for fun? What are the needs in their lives? Once you really understand that, it becomes much easier to find them -- and find a lot of them.

    The second concern you have is coming off like a used-car salesman. This is a common belief: that sales is a dirty job where you're trying to "push" something on someone. But in real sales, you're serving the client. Helping them. When you REALLY understand someone's problems and can help them, they'll pay virtually anything to get your help. That's why sales is fundamentally serving, not pushing.

    I'll show you how to do both in upcoming posts.]

  4. This post is great. I’m spanish, living in Spain and I really love how you write.
    I think that my barriers to earning more are that i don’t know what to do. I have very little experience in my industry (marketing and business administration) so, what could I do? This is a question that is killing me, specially If i tell you i’m without a job.
    By the way, with regard to your previous post I must say that ” I will teach you to be reach” has helped me with my English. It’s so interesting that makes easier for me reading english every day. I really appreciate it.

    • Hey Rosa. If you lived in the U.S. I would definitely tell you to teach Spanish. I’m trying to learn on my own but in time I am going to find/pay someone to teach me. Second languages are very appealing in the business world.

  5. Aside from getting more money (which is sweet), I just want to say that simply knowing that you CAN earn money outside of a job is a really great feeling. I’m not freaked out about graduating and getting a job in my field like a lot of my peers are because I know I have at least some skills that will keep me from selling all of my possessions and living off ramen, like some of my friends do when they can’t find a job.

  6. This was an amazing post.

    I’ve been earning $1000 more a month since May at a second job as a consultant that I do in my spare time. What’s surprised me is that it doesn’t take up more time, but has allowed me to do more overall. I’m less worried about finances and paying off the debt I have, so I actually go out and do the things that make me happy. I don’t feel as paralyzed anymore. And I’m ahead of all my financial goals. This post was a good reminder that I can make even more. I particularly related to wanting smart people around you. I often complain about this, so I’m going to take more responsibility to find and surround myself with motivated people. Thanks!

    [Ramit's response: Thanks Rebecca! I agree. I heard from so many people that they just don't have people around them that can challenge and motivate them. It's incredible to put these people -- who want to be motivated, but don't have the social system around them -- together in a structured course and watch them blossom. There is tremendous value in being exposed to other people who are ambitious and skilled.]

  7. Ramit, I wholeheartedly agree about systems. I have implemented all of your money “systems.” Automatic savings, automatic investing, automatic bill pay, sync bill dates, etc.

    I never wonder how much money I have or will have at the end of the month, I know. My savings account is constantly growing (so is my checking.) My 401(k) is constantly growing. I’m never late on bills. The amount of time I spend looking at my personal finances has dropped to maybe an hour a month, as opposed to a couple hours a week.

    All of my financial attention is now focused on making more money and what to do with that money. No more wasting my energy on things that can be completely automated with just a few clicks.

    And like you said, this should be applied to everything. Great insight. Thank you.

  8. 1. What are your barriers to earning more? (Think deeply…some barriers are buried, like “Only evil people earn money” or “I don’t deserve to earn more”)

    Lack of time/energy. I work full-time in a field that requires a high level of attention to detail (it’s all data entry and data checking) and when I get home I’m so tired of staring at a computer screen! But my side-line skill set is all computer based, webdesign being my poison of choice.

    I have made money from web-design, and what got me wasn’t how hard it was to find clients, but how quickly my time got filled and I couldn’t handle all the incoming work. I felt that by only working evenings and weekends I was taking too long to turn projects around, and thus failing the client.

    All of my clients have come back to me, bar one, but I almost end up pushing them away because I don’t think I can do the job justice. There are better web-designers out there with more time!

    2. Have you started to earn more in the past 6 months?

    No, my side-income has actually declined, because I went from part-time to full-time at my day job. I suppose I earn more from the day job though….

    3. If not, what’s holding you back?

    As the first question? I know what I need to know, I kind of feel like I could do it, if I wasn’t so doggone tired when I get home!

    [Ramit's response: Time management and "I don't have any time" is one of the most common barriers I hear. To some extent, it's true (especially if you have a family). But there are also people busier than any of us who somehow STILL manage to do a ton. At IWT/Earn1K, we've developed strategies to prioritize and work effectively. For example, I have a student who has a wife and two kids. He can only work after they go to sleep, so he set up a retainer system where he can work any time. Because he LOVES what he does (IT work), he's thrilled to spend a few hours/week on it. And he earns thousands of dollars/month for this.]

    • “how quickly my time got filled and I couldn’t handle all the incoming work.”

      I had a similar experience, and solved it by doubling my rates. If your time gets filled up again, double them again. Sign short project contracts (not all-encompassing “I will do everything” contracts) so you don’t burn yourself out and so you have the flexibility to raise your rates later.

      -Erica

    • P.S. I’m up to $500/hr and my schedule still gets filled regularly. I’ve been turning down consulting at that rate because I’m so swamped with things that earn even more.

      -Erica

  9. Thanks for the response Ramit. I took your Earn 1K course and am still having trouble finding “where they hang out” and “what they to for fun”. Looking forward to any additional input you have.

    Re: the second point – even if you find someone that needs your service, you still have to sell them that you’re the one to provide the service, am I wrong? That’s what I was trying to say.

  10. great post, love all the content, all great stuff. your reinforcements of earning more versus spending less are great too. i’ve had a rocky couple years, income wise, and while i’m keeping my head above water by slashing costs on everything, life just isn’t that much fun. i can’t go out with friends, buy new clothes, get video games, see shows, etc- just don’t have the money.
    finally i said to heck with all this and started applying for any job related to my field, instead of just cherry jobs. i already nailed a great interview yesterday and am looking forward to putting some elbow grease into MAKING some money, not just not-spending it!
    plus, those credit cards aren’t payin off themselves.

  11. 1. I don’t have time to develop my business idea.
    2. Not really
    3. Time because i have an idea, the skills and an expert in the field

    I really want to earn more as it is to help my parents

  12. I like this post and am excited to see the future content in the next 4 weeks! However, I disagree with the “saving is a lost cause” mantra. Saving has provided me the freedom to pursue what I enjoy without a 9 to 5 job, and focus full time on other ways to make money. It doesn’t have to be all bad. It can be kind of fun and creative. If someone doesn’t have the resolve to save, it will be harder for them to have the resolve to earn more. Having resolve to implement a good idea in order to make money is important. It can be disheartening to make those 50 calls and not get one sale. It takes resolve to push through that fear and loss of hope and keep going. You are right that action is key. Sitting around wanting to hear more information without taking action is useless.

  13. Great post, as always, Ramit! Quick follow-up: is there any way you could point the way to a system to help people like the robot-building job-seeker named Eugene whom you mentioned in the “Systems are Important” graf? I need to change jobs in the worst way, and I have suspected for a long time that there must be some sort of system out there for successful job hunting–but I can’t quite crack the code. My primary motivation happens to be personal and not financial–but it seems like a job change would be a great way for a lot of readers to get a relatively fast pop in their earning power (and drop in stress levels) before moving on to the side businesses that seem to be the focus of your Earn 1K course. Any chance you could comment here (perhaps with a book recommendation?) on what works in a job hunt, or perhaps even consider devoting a free-standing post to this topic at some point?

    [Ramit's response: Scott, unfortunately I'm not focusing on helping people find a better job until sometime next year. This is the year of earning more and I'm focusing specifically on earning money on the side.]

  14. My fall back is what you said the number 1 reason is….lack of an idea. I’m not sure what aspects of my skills and knowledge i could sell while still not creating a conflict of interest at work. I work at a credit union, as a personal banker…ie investments and lending. We also do all of our own underwriting.

    [Ramit's response: Dan, it's OK not to know what idea you might pursue. But what action have you taken to find a profitable idea? If the answer is that you've taken no real steps, then I'd argue that you need to change something.]

    • My focus for the past couple of years has been to persue further schooling to improve my ability to earn for the job. For the past 4-5 months i’ve been looking at adding side income. You are correct in assuming that i haven’t done to proactively search for a viable idea. I’ve looked into a few things, and seen what people are charging, but again, it’s the starting point. I think im overly caught up in the thought process, and need to spend more time doing, then thinking. I”ll analyze later…once i have some funds coming in.

  15. 1. What are your barriers to earning more?

    That there’s so many fun things to do with my time, and that I have ‘enough’ money. In reality, I spend a lot of my time aimlessly reading shit on the internet, chatting with friends (phone or IM), or other not-very-satisfying ways of spending that time. And the 2nd issue, ‘enough’ money – what does that even mean?

    2. Have you started to earn more in the past 6 months?

    Yes. I went from a $35/hour employee job to $80 an hour contract job. Now I pay my own insurance, expenses, and some extra taxes. It’s still a $35,000 a year raise. Plus I can raise my own rates as demand increases, rather than waiting on an annual review.

    3. If not, what’s holding you back?

    I still trade my time for money; I don’t know how to automate what I do (computer security work). I’m shy about approaching clients (current work comes from people I met while presenting at conferences). Don’t know what skills would increase my market value long term, other than just getting higher bids for my time. Not doing anything on the side – this is my main career.

  16. “The #1 barrier to people earning more is finding an idea.”

    I am desperately eager to hear more on this. I know you just suggested to DanP that he needs to change something to fix this – but what? Other than brainstorming ideas and running them by friends, what else do you suggest? I need a way to kick start this, even if the first idea doesn’t work.

  17. Thanks for all of the great advice. I’ve bought your book, enjoyed it tremendously, and passed it along to many people.

    Just to let you know, I am a twenty-something that “sit[s] at home (no cable) and knit[s].” Knitting can actually be quite an expensive hobby. I’ve decided to take your advice though, and try making a profit off things I knit. We’ll see if that increases my revenue instead of cutting back on buying yarn. :)

  18. [...] 5 surprising insights on earning more money | I Will Teach You To Be R… [...]

  19. I had to post. I have read your RSS feed for more than 6 months. I browse though, and consider what you’re saying. A couple months ago I finally checked into the Automating My Finances thing and found that I don’t have enough cushion to do this comfortably, so instead of doing SOMETHING I put it off until i can create that cushion out of thin air.

    Today, i read this post and suddenly a switch flips and I realize that I have a pretty significant skill set that I could use for income on multiple levels. I pondered your barriers question and a light bulb went off.

    My Barrier? What if I do manage to make more money and get the freedom I desire and then somehow lose it all and end up living back in my parents basement again? And, worse, I realized I also believe that since I don’t manage money well NOW that adding $1k won’t help and I’ll end up in a bigger mess than I am now. Right now, right here, with this paycheck, I know what to expect. If I try something new, I’m into the unknown, and I’m scared.

    Well, I’ll tell you what, today, Today I say
    BRING IT ON!!

  20. My biggest barrier has been a fear that my lack of formal education and job related experience (versus hobby related experience) would stop people from wanting to hire me as a freelance writer. Four months ago I finally took the first step and now have one client. I’m still working through my fear and am working on getting a second client now. I’d like to have more clients, but still battle with the fear since I’ve been doing this professionally for less than six months and have no college background.

  21. I hate you Ramit, you just show me that I’ve done nothing in Earn1k for almost 1 month so let’s go for the Q/R game.

    1. What are your barriers to earning more? (Think deeply…some barriers are buried, like “Only evil people earn money” or “I don’t deserve to earn more”)
    - The one idea that I love is helping a company which is located in France to develop their business here in Belgium . But their main product is a trademarked product and I don’t know how to ask them if I can do this.
    - I’m a French native speaker so it is hard for me to start a course in English after a 12-hour day at work.
    - My girlfriend doesn’t understand why I’m doing this and so she is not very supportive.
    - I’m afraid to fail so I prefer not to start.
    2. Have you started to earn more in the past 6 months?
    Only a little but it was more “imposed” to me (I’m a former Physics assistant at the local University so students always came for help) than find by me.
    3. If not, what’s holding you back?
    Quite the same than question 1.
    I think I’m going to go through lesson 4 today, it is time now :)

    Thanks for all

  22. [...] 5 surprising insights on earning more money | I Will Teach You To … [...]

  23. This is one of the few posts from you I have actually read the entire thing through without skipping! Great stuff. Really great stuff! Typically I start reading and lose interest with it too quickly, but this one kept me drawn for some reason.

    In response to the questions:

    1. What are your barriers to earning more? (Think deeply…some barriers are buried, like “Only evil people earn money” or “I don’t deserve to earn more”)
    > I get DISTRACTED. One week I will be working like mad on my idea, the next something will come up and my focus changes and I just end up in a boat where I’m not doing anything – and I don’t realise this, I still feel like I am doing something but at the end of the week I have accomplished barely anything.

    2. Have you started to earn more in the past 6 months?
    > Yes and no. I’ve landed two clients, however both have been one offs. They are now finished. Currently I’m investing myself in self promotion (for consulting) as well as starting up a few self funded projects for a passive income which seems quite feasible!

    3. If not, what’s holding you back?
    > Distraction. I need to hold myself accountable. I need to stop wasting my time.

  24. 1. My biggest barrier is fear. Just plain old “what if I go out there and they don’t like me” stage fright. I’d tried to start a sideline business before– I put all this work into figuring it out, planning and setting pricing. When I finally advertised it: nothing but crickets, man. It’s kind of humiliating, to be so excited about something and find out that nobody is interested in your offer.

    But I’m trying to talk myself down from that. From the Earn1K course, I know what the biggest fail was: making something that *I* wanted to make, rather than making something my customers would want to buy. I have the techniques and strategies to discover what customers actually will pay for – now I just have to implement them. But the fear, combined with the usual daily cycle of job, veg, sleep, makes for some vicious inertia.

    2. I actually have started to earn more. I negotiated a new bonus arrangement at my day job, and I drafted an outline for an ebook. Now I just need to write it!

    3. The writing of said ebook…and also, my chosen sideline is tutoring. I feel like nobody will even be looking for a writing tutor for high-schoolers until fall. But maybe I’ll just throw up some ads and see what happens…then I can have them refined and optimized in time for the fall rush!

  25. [...] 5 surprising insights on earning more money | I Will Teach You To … [...]

  26. http://consumerist.com/2010/07/27-of-the-sickest-things-youve-done-to-save-money.html

    This is another common example of small cost-cutting wins that make life not worth living.

  27. I haven’t been able to take (afford) the Earn 1K course yet so I’m looking forward to the upcoming content.
    1. I have two barriers to earning more. One is that I don’t know what service or product I can provide to people–I’m not confident that I have the skill or knowledge. I’m narrowing it down but haven’t done much testing. The other is that the only support I have believes the way to earn more is by working for a big company and advancing until I’m 40 and then doing teaching or consulting.
    2. I’ve started doing some 300-400 word freelance articles. It’s only brought in about $150 a month, but it’s more than I was doing 6 months ago. I’m ready to go bigger.

  28. Just so you know, ramit, Knitting is a surprisingly expensive hobby. Raw materials cost more than you can buy a finished product for, nevermind all the time you spend actually knitting. You can immediately write off anyone who uses knitting as an example of how to save money; they are dead wrong.

    [Ramit's reply: Thanks for the correction. I assumed you just found some yarn and copper wire in a dirty alleyway and used it to knit whatever came to mind while gently stroking a purring cat on a recliner chair. I stand corrected.]

  29. I enjoyed this post but have a barrier – what if my current skill set for my Earn$1K is the same as I use for my job, and my employer would see my activity on the side as competition?

  30. Hi

    Absolutely love this post. I too am fed up with the advice that tells you to cancel your cable subscription or anything else that is remotely enjoyable to “become rich”. If I have to live like a monk to become rich I think I would rather stay as i am :)

  31. Some GREAT shit here, finally! Looking forward to what’s coming up.

    Two issues:
    1.) I’m not understanding how, “If you earned just $300/month for 5 years, that’s $18,000/year.”
    and
    2.) “In fact, as you know I generally hate artists because they are the worst business people in the world.” seems a pretty stupid thing to say. I have no disagreement that artists, in general, make mediocre business people, but that’s hardly a reason to hate them.

    Anyway, I’m not a tremendously loyal reader, but this overall post is exceptional, and I’ll be paying closer attention.

  32. I’m excited to learn more! I recently found your site and have to say, I prefer the idea of earning more to being overly frugal (no one could ever convince me it’s fun to ration out toilet paper).

    I’m a little hurt that you lump all artists in as bad business people since that stereotype (supported by artists and non-artists alike) is a powerful stigma to go up against. I’m best of both worlds: a business school grad (it was the one thing I had any interest in getting a degree in) who is also an artist, and I’m trying to find a way that I can combine the two and earn money.

    So I hope that you don’t completely discount the creative entrepreneurs when you’re giving out tips!

    As for your questions…
    1. I think a big part of what’s holding me back is the worst-case scenarios that shoot through my head about making money (friends will hate me, family will resent me, etc etc) combined with the idea that creativity can’t make me money, so I’d have to give up a very big part of me to earn more and do something that I’m not passionate about. So I don’t even try coming up with an idea, because anything fun and creative that pops into my head, I decide isn’t worthy to even test because “it won’t work” in that arbitrary “no one would pay you to do anything you enjoy” train of thought.

    2. Yes and no. I actually did better pre-2010 with side jobs, but I moved jobs this year to something that earns more (still about half of what my b.comm friends earn) but chose to do something temporary because I’m moving to another country in about a month.

    3. I tell myself I don’t have the experience to earn money on the side. And if only I was more of THIS kind of person I would be capable of doing it. I started off in real estate after I graduated and the most popular question from potential clients was “how old are you?” so I’ve worked up a very good barrier for myself about not being BLANK yet so I can do it. Obviously, if I knew what BLANK was, I would be in a better position to get rid of that barrier instead of hitting an invisible wall each time.

  33. I was wondering where you were hiding. Let me give these questions a try…

    1. What are your barriers to earning more? (Think deeply…some barriers are buried, like “Only evil people earn money” or “I don’t deserve to earn more”)

    I’m 22 so you can imagine what my barriers are:

    -Lack of focus. I sent off 3 texts just while writing this post.
    -Too much time spent on dating life.
    -Impatience. You know the classic saying, “God please grant me patience, but do hurry.” I’m just a really impatient dude.

    2. Have you started to earn more in the past 6 months?

    Yes I have. I’m fairly content with my increased income, but I would of course like to somehow increase certain forms of my income (blogging/freelance writing). It’s one of those things where I’ve researched/outline what I need to do, but now I need to apply it.

    I will say this though– through increasing the income that I earn on the side, I’ve been able to scale back my hours at work and become a better older brother/friend my having more time for what matters most in my life.

  34. This was absolutely genius. I’m going to send this site to a thousand of my friends.

  35. “If you earned just $300/month for 5 years, that’s $18,000/year” — you mean $18,000, not $18,000/year, right?

    [Ramit's response: Yes, thanks. Fixed.]

  36. I think fear of the unknown is a common barrier. Unfortunately, most people’s current financial situation is very scarey as well, so trying to improve your financial situation should be exciting not scarey. I am still a big believer in saving as you need to have some assets you can get your hands on quickly if needed.

  37. Ramit, I agree with most of your stuff about earning more instead of saving more but I would like to add one note. Sometimes changing habits can save money and be fun. For example, I started walking more recently and biking to work instead of driving. It’s amazingly fun and it saves me money. The key is to find stuff you enjoy and not just do it for the 3 cents you’ll save. Other than that, yes, absolutely, focus on making more.

  38. Never mind that few people have the skills or discipline to save 10% of their income.

    well, in Q1/2010 the average savings rate of households in Germany was 15.2 percent (longtime average savings rate is somewhere around 10 percent)… so apparently it’s not that hard after all, if 80 million Germans manage to do it :-)

  39. A few days back I received an email with ideas for earning the extra 1k. I really question the dog walking and babysitting ideas. How will you make 1k ? You would have to put a lot of hours in. ( Unless I just need to brain storm this idea some more)… Your success stories so far, seem to be folks that had high dollar skills that could transfer over to freelance. It just seems that you will never make $100 per hour walking dogs.

    How do you test your products or ideas ? Is there a post on that somewhere ?
    Thank you for your ideas and thoughts. I think you are correct in that I need to pursue making more money not focusing so much on frugality. I actually read a frugality post the other day where a gentleman was sharing how he goes with out toilet paper ………… You don’t want to know. ; )

    ~ Christie

  40. You know I was just sitting here at my laptop re-doing my budget because here (in Australia) it’s the beginning of our new financial year and I’ve not done as much as I’d planned in accordance with my list of Things To Do which I wrote at the beginning of this year. I love the fact that you encourage people that the way not to go is by cutting back on lattes, gym etc. I love my gym but I don’t drink latte but I love buying books from Amazon. I run my own online business which is only small at the moment and manageable, trying not to overload myself but yes! earning more money really is the answer. If I truly got organised I could bring in more clients but I’m also studying a Degree part-time and have two teenage children so I will have to be SUPER organised. Do you have an article on that?! Sigh.

    Cutting back sucks, it really is a no-brainer to earn more money but your in-depth enthusiastic writing really has made my day and now I’m keen again!

    Thanks!

    And Happy Belated Birthday to you.
    Jennifer
    Australia

  41. My problem is where to begin. I know that a website is one of them. While I do have one, it needs to be developed further. My other problem is that in order for my “idea” to work, I will need to begin initially with a free service. The only thing I think I could have going my way is that I may have come up with a way that my potentials customers will come to me rather than me requiring to put on a sales “hat” on and dread the elevator pitch.

  42. WTF? Ya’ll are missing the $*@@&#% point. Nobody gives a damn! Quit studying it, over-thinking it, talking about it… GO DO SOMETHING!!! Otherwise it doesn’t make any difference how good your idea is, or isn’t, or might have been, or whether you have some hurdle required “in order for your idea to work”. IT’S NEVER GONNA WORK AS LONG AS YOU MAKE EXCUSES, AND DON”T GO MAKE IT HAPPEN.

  43. [...] or more interesting work, why not do something about it?  Leverage your experience and skills to earn extra money on the side; negotiate a remote-work arrangement; or consciously choose between cycles of working to earn, and [...]

  44. 1. Barriers?
    I’m a teenager and I am supported by my parents. I won’t have to make money or any kind of salary until I graduate from school.

    2. Increased money?
    Yes, I got a job. It pays minimum wage, but I’d do it for free. Talk about passionate about work :) My boss is amazing and I think that she’s optimized the workers’ experience.

    • I hope you are smarter than I was. Put money away to take to college with you. It will be the smartest thing you ever did. I struggled for 4 long years with work study jobs making $100/biweekly. I wish I would have been more prepared.

  45. 1. What are your barriers to earning more? (Think deeply…some barriers are buried, like “Only evil people earn money” or “I don’t deserve to earn more”)
    Ramit, I’ve been on a treadmill running at like level 2 for the last couple of years. I’ve been making about $2,000 working freelance for the last year and half working about 4-5 days a month. I bought your course learned A LOT, but did JACK SHIT and still on the tread mill. I even had a client fly me out for a workshop (paid for) to Venice, CA about how the company does business and what-not. I’m not lazy when it comes to the work, but LAZY AS ALL HELL when it comes to marketing myself and doing the business side (aka following through with the earn 1k material). I can see it in other friends that do creative work like myself. We love doing the work (work our ass off doing it) but do nothing about the marketing/business side.

    I would say my barriers are bein’ in that “getting by zone” or living life like I’m retired (or retared) at 35 yrs working a couple of days a month. This sounds really stupid, but I don’t know what the hell I’d do with $10k or $20k a month if I made it. So, there’s some limiting beliefs and other crap there.

    The Twitter image message is like looking in the mirror. Pretty creepy.

    2. Have you started to earn more in the past 6 months?
I’m gonna pitch 3 projects to exsisting clients. Other than that nothing.

    3. If not, what’s holding you back?
    My problem is sticking to a damn plan. This damn ADD (I’m joking but maybe not). Bein’ Self Employed is kinda lonely to be honest. Sounds pretty dumb, but a support group of some kind would help. Budgeting my time is the same issue with my money. I don’t do anything about it. Not having a goal for the amount of money I’d like to make. Or what sorta of lifestyle I’d like to have and what that would cost.

  46. My accountant related a story from her days working at a large firm, where the managing partner warned that, due to the loss of a few major clients, they would “either have to make some significant cuts, or figure out how to bring in more money – and bringing in more money is much more fun than making cuts.” Same general point that you are making.

    I try to keep my expenses low, while still spending money on the things that I enjoy – eating out a few times a week with friends, and traveling several weeks a year. While I live on my salary, I also started up a small business simply to bring in some additional money, all of which would be “extra.” Having some diversification of income is great.

  47. Right now I am still in my training phase so all parttime work is restricted by my department. However, once my training is done I am going to try to get a job with UOP. I hear I can make an extra $1000/mo teaching a 6-8 week course. That isn’t bad. I even have the option of taking on more parttime work for $22/hr. I have a M.A. so I am going to put it to use until I pay off my car (18900 left on my Honda) and put away enough 6 months of expenses and a downpayment on a house.

  48. Writing to you from my cube that frustrates the hell out of me, I am beginning to realize that I am the barrier to myself earning more. Whether it is earning more money through the corporate world or trying to earn that side income myself. The problem is me and that I do not take any action. My problem is one you depicted, I just don’t think that the ideas I have will be demanded by people. The ones that I do, I need to develop the skills much better. Gotta start somewhere. Good post.

  49. I’m 20 years old and taking general ed courses in college because I don’t know what to do with my life. Yes, I’m working and have a Roth IRA and investing/saving automatically, but I feel like I do not have anything that I can offer as a service. I do have some talents, like guitar and basketball, but who would want to hire a 20 year old when there are way more qualified people out there, especially people who have more experience than I have life?

    I feel like my age coupled with my lack of service-offering talents is what gets me worried that I can’t do any of this “earn more money” stuff.

    • It’s terrifying to be 18 and at that stage because you’ve already finished your Gen Ed. I also work and save automatically, and I don’t have anything that I can offer as a service. Who wants to hire some kid to do something that someone else can do much better?

  50. A few comments touched on one point that has kept me back from pursuing “selling myself/my skills as a business.” Trading time for money. It’s a trap that I can’t stay in IF I want to raise a family and NOT work full time whether it be for myself or someone else. Granted a few people mentioned that you can raise your rates and take on less clients which would free up your time without reducing income and that’s a good idea but I would rather develop a business that is on autopilot (aka passive income.) Funny thing is once that auto income is in place I would probably just use my time and skills doing what i’m already doing (event coordinator.) The only difference is I could do it because I love it not in part because I want the income.

    My other hesitation is with ideas. I have over 10 ideas that recirculate through my head on a weekly basis (i’m an Aries, it’s normal.) Some I have put into practice and then let slide, while others never got finish or started. How does a person like me stick to one idea? Or is there a way to use all my ideas in one business?

  51. I love these posts, loved Ramit’s book and am a firm subscriber of the updates. It amuses me tho that this is all aimed at 20-30 something folks who are just starting out. I just don’t fit in with you guys at all!! I’m a 50 year old single mom, so many of the things that Ramit teaches have to be tweaked to fit me – but I’ve tweaked them! Obviously I don’t have to worry about building business experience (been a legal assistant for nearly 30 years), so all of the info on getting good jobs outta college don’t apply. On the flip side, I have a nasty history of making stupid financial decisions so some of the stuff involving building credit and using credit cards simply isn’t doable at this point. I had previously automated my bill paying, so that was a no-brainer. The key was being kicked in the butt about savings/investments – turning 50 with 7k in my 401k is a little scary! So I have taken the investment info and put it into overdrive (and yeah, become a conscious spender, thank you very much!). I’m totally interested in getting out of the legal profession too – I make decent money but being tied to attorneys hand-and-foot for decades is NOT my dream job. I’m working on building a potential client base for a professional side business (personal/executive assistant) and am looking forward to seeing Ramit’s new coursework. Oh, and happy birthday, Ramit!!

  52. I’m in my 50′s too and been a corporate drone for one entity or another my entire life. Obviously I’m worth something or they wouldn’t keep paying me.

    The big question is what can I do that people will readily pay for? I got a whole lot of things – but what will pay? I’d live in a single room flat if I could be my own man. I’d… wait… the factory whistle is blowing….must go back….please send help!.

  53. Great post. One thing I do find that bums me out is lack of support. None of my friends think about this stuff, or rather, maybe they think about making more money, but not in a side business kind of way. So, if I start to talk about making money using skills I have, they say “Awesome!” and then that’s it.

    So, the reason for my post I guess is: where to meet like-minded people? Ramit, you don’t have a message board system, do you? Anyone have a “meetup” group out there?? Of course, I don’t want to fall into the trap (which I am totally prone to do) of getting caught up with the talking about it and not doing, but it’s encouraging to hear and share stories, networking, etc.

    Thanks, Ramit!

    • I know — it can be really hard to stay motivated when none of your friends understand/support what you’re trying to do. To answer your question, yes, in my course, I have an add-on where you get live help, accountability partners, Mastermind groups, and access to Earn1k instructors.

  54. I agree that the biggest impediment to earning more money is just getting off your ass and doing or changing anything, no matter what it is. So much time gets locked up in finding the perfect idea, time to start, or support group, when just throwing anything against the wall and seeing what sticks would make so much more progress.

    I’ve recently been thinking about taking an extreme approach to the problem by setting up a commitment contract with severe financial penalties. For example: “Make $1k on the side in six months as judged by my brother or some other arbiter. If the goal is not met, $10,000 will be deducted from my bank account and donated to the NRA.” I know there are websites that let you set up a contract like that. I just need to catch myself in a moment of motivation to set it up, and then that fear of loss can step in when the motivation wanes.

  55. [...] This post from Ramit Sethi is a fantastic summary of why people fail at managing money “by the books”. I strongly recommend you read it and consider your own psychology on money. [...]

  56. [...] Will Teach You To Be Rich: Five surprising insights into earning more money. I couldn’t agree more with Ramit’s focus on earning more. This is good [...]

  57. Hi Ramit,

    Excellent article. I run a fitness boot camp business and we are just wrapping up a 6 Week Body Transformation contest that had over 60 applicants, from which we selected 31 participants. The contest ends Tuesday and now is the time to sign them all up for recurring monthly contracts. This post came at a crucial time, and I’m very glad I took the time to read it. I am 2 years out of college, running my own business, scared as hell and excited all at the same time. Historically I do not value my skills enough, but reading this post made me realize that all of my clients’ lives are richer when I am in them.

    Great content, I am excited to close some new clients and change lives. Just started reading your book too.

    Thank you,

    - Casey

  58. I enjoy reading your articles and agree with a lot of your points. I have been working outside of my “day job” as income incease here is limited to how much time I spend at work. (Time is an assest and once spent it aint coming back!! ) The team I now work with are showing me how to create residule income through a simple system, thereby creating wealth and time. One thing I have found is that systems only work if a clearly defined, passionate dream and goals are set. Keep up the great work
    Thanks, Andrew

  59. [...] Will Teach You to Be Rich posts 5 surprising insights on earning more money . This post deals [...]

  60. First of all Ramit, I’m a first time commentor on your site, and from what I’ve seen so far, I love it.

    Your articles on earning more instead of saving more are spot on. As a naturally frugal person who only spends a lot on food (Admittedly, most of it is homemade, so even in that aspect, I’m better than most) I don’t feel like spending even less.

    I want MORE, and will be working on achieving those goals, and someday soon, I’ll be on a beach in Hawaii sipping down a Pina Colada and sending my thanks out to people like you.

    From the future me.

    Thanks Ramit.

  61. [...] week, Ramit from penned nearly 4000 words on 5 surprising insights on earning more money. When I saw that it had A) surprising insights and B) earning more money, I rushed to read the [...]

  62. [...] few days ago over at I Will Teach You To Be Rich, Ramit talked about saving and compared it to cutting out various foods in your diet.  His attitude seems to be that [...]

  63. [...] 5 Surprising Insights on Earning More Money from I Will Teach You to be Rich. This post made me think about several things. First, I don’t agree with his criticisms of frugality. Life doesn’t have to suck because you are frugal. And being frugal doesn’t mean you can’t work on earning more as well. If you have read “The Millionaire Next Door” then you know many millionaires are frugal as well. That being said there isn’t much more I can do on cutting back expenses and it is time to work on increasing my income. When he writes about people looking for new material rather instead of actually doing something I recognized myself. I need to stop spending so much time poring over blogs and forums looking for ways to make money and spend more time actually trying to make money. I will share my efforts and results at trying new ways to make money. Related Posts:Welcome to Tight Fisted MiserPublicity: Good,Bad, and Possible Click FraudDon’t Forget to Make MoneyPowered by Contextual Related Posts Share and Enjoy: [...]

  64. I completely agree with all what you said in your post. I am from czech republic and I have been a freelancer for past 7 years. I had been teaching English for first four years, and I got exhausted from that. I knew I wanted to something else. First year of my new business (teaching relaxation techniques to women) I was learning how to do it, during my second year I was barely earning for 1/5 of what I earned as an English teacher.

    During second year I knew there was something wrong. And I did not know what was that. Yet knew I wanted/needed more money.So I kept asking myself a question – what is wrong? Then the answer came – Maybe I am doing something wrong or haven´t started doing something important. I needed to change something. This only answer helped me to change the course of my actions. And within one year I was able to tripple my income.

    Now I am working four hours a day and earning two thirds of what I have been making as an English teacher. And yet I work three times less. I am happier. And each month my income is growing – 10 – 20% a month. And I just keep asking the same question – what can I change to earn more?

  65. Very interesting. We are our own greatest critic and competition! Great article. If you don’t muster the courage to think critically about your situation, you’ll end up living a life of conformity & complacency.

  66. 1.My biggest barrier is not knowing where to start and who my real clients are.Being in a new country has crippled my success of job employment as a result of experience level which happens to be zero.

    2. I have not earned anything in the last 7months

    3. I am been heard back by myself, not knowing where to start from and if my idea is good enough. fear of the unknown

  67. Ramit. I am ready to forget about the past and my fears. prepared to get rejected and try. Taking the earn1k program has been on my mind. but am still waiting to here how that is going to work for me since all testimonials are from USA and i am from UK. Your book in Uk Version shaped my decisions and is playing important decision in my finance planning but would love to see your earn1k program do the same. Now is the time for you to answer that question for me.

    The only thing i know how to do much is motivation as you would find on my site. how do i find audience and begin to turn these into cash stream. i look forward to your opinion

    • Yes, we have many students from abroad. That’s not as much an issue as how dedicated and how much effort are you willing to put into the course. Hope to see you inside!