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Considering a career in consulting? Avoid these 5 stupid mistakes

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This is a guest post from Pamela Slim, who writes at Escape From Cubicle Nation.

A lot of young people are interested in pursuing a career path as a consultant for obvious reasons:

  • Good money
  • The opportunity to travel
  • Exposure to many different industries and business models
  • The chance to work with many different kinds of leaders
  • Smart coworkers
  • Flexibility and freedom

As someone who spent nearly a decade as a self-employed consultant, I can attest that these are all valid and good reasons to consider this career path. But before jumping in with both feet, it is important to understand what you are getting into, and how to avoid stupid mistakes.

For context, there are a number of different types of consulting businesses with some advantages and drawbacks in each:

  • Big 5 consulting firms like Bain & Company, Accenture and PriceWaterhouseCoopers which generally work for the largest Fortune 500 companies on complex, global projects
    Advantages: Very well-developed and defined consulting methodologies, ample work, clear training programs and career paths and bias towards young, smart workers
    Drawbacks: As huge companies, they can have lots of bureaucracy, politics and lame management policies. As a young trainee, you often have to slog through years of totally insane hours in sometimes less-than ideal conditions (I have seen many young consultants smashed together in a conference room like sardines pouring over reams of paper). (Unrelated trivia fact: John Legend worked for BCG before launching his music career).
  • “Boutique” consulting firms with a handful of specialized experts in particular industries or business problems.These firms are much smaller than the Big 5, but often have interesting work.
    Advantages:More direct access to the senior consultants, which provides great mentoring opportunities, more client contact, less bureaucracy.
    Drawbacks:Less infrastructure, fewer opportunities for broad exposure to many different businesses.This article, written by someone who works for a boutique firm, gives more specific examples.
  • Consulting divisions of product or service companiesIBM, or Oracle are examples of these.These tend to supplement and hawk the products of their parent company, but do involve some more broad-based consulting projects.
    Advantages:Similar to their Big 5 counterparts, they have well-developed methodologies, training programs and career paths.
    Drawbacks:Ditto on bureaucracy, politics and lame policies.You also may not feel comfortable force-fitting products in a consulting solution if they are not the right solution for the customer.
  • Self-employed “Lone Ranger” consulting firms. This option is where you hang out your own shingle and go after clients yourself.You can specialize in specific things like web strategy or marketing advice or human resources.
    Advantages: Total creative control, ground-up learning about all aspects of starting a business, direct work with clients, great learning opportunities, all the profits for yourself.
    Drawbacks: Having to create everything yourself can be overwhelming.If you don’t have much experience, even if you are really talented, you may have trouble convincing people to hire you.You have to constantly market and sell your services at the same time as delivering the work.

What are key skills required to be a good consultant?

Some people assume that you have to have many years of work experience to qualify as a consultant.Depending on your focus and industry, this can be true.But if you have either very strong natural consulting skills or very specialized expertise, you can still act in a consulting role even if you can count the number of years you have been in the workforce on one hand.With the different types of consulting roles I described above, you could start working for a Big 5 firm for example, learn as much as you can about their methodology, then in a couple of years venture out on your own.Regardless of which configuration you choose, you should have the following skills:

  • The ability to view the “big picture” of an organization and see how all the parts fit together.This is often described as “systems thinking” defined here with some resources.
  • Excellent interpersonal skills and the ability to relate to people from all levels of an organization.Your ability to do meaningful work in an organization is based on the level of trust and credibility you have internally.If you are working on a large project, you often have to interact with extremely technical and detailed people who have a high level of skepticism, as well as present your findings in a professional and compelling way to impatient and time-crunched executives.
  • Confidence to stand up for what you believe in and the grace to admit when you are wrong. If people are paying you hundreds of dollars an hour for your advice, you need to have confidence in your ideas.But you also have to be willing to make adjustments if you learn that you may be incorrect.A good attitude is summed up by my favorite “asshole busting” professor Bob Sutton from Stanford who promotes “strong opinions, weakly held.”
  • The ability to synthesize a great amount of data in an effective presentation in a short period of time. When you walk into a new organization, information comes at you like water out of a fire hose.You have to learn how to read quickly, ask great questions, review the right data and synthesize information.The more you do it, the easier it becomes.
  • Knowledge of change management. Even if you are working on very technical projects (perhaps especially in this case), you need to understand how human beings in organizations react to change.Here is a quick primer to get started:

Now that you have an understanding of the different kinds of consulting roles you can play and some key skills required to be effective, I wanted to share some of the worst mistakes I have witnessed by consulting compadres over the years:

5 stupid mistakes of new (or sometimes very experienced!) consultants

  1. Acting like an arrogant colonist. I have seen consultants swagger in to a new company with the sensitivity of slave traders.They view the existing employees as stupid and “backwards” and do little to hide their distain.This attitude will make you more hated than “The Bobs” from Office Space and will guarantee that employees will do whatever they can to sabotage your project.You may disagree with the way the organization is run and get frustrated by the attitudes of resentful and complacent employees.But do not forget they are human beings, many with children and families that depend on them.There is nothing inherently evil with cutting staff (a very frequent recommendation of consultants), but such a decision should never be taken lightly.Treat everyone you meet with dignity and respect and never, for a moment, think that you are superior by virtue of your role as an outside “expert.”You aren’t.
  2. Selling your words by the pound. There is an infectious plague propagated by large consulting firms that compels new consultants to create huge, incomprehensible presentations and reports.Your executive sponsors love them because they justify the huge rates they spend to bring in you and your colleagues.The problem is that these 400-slide PowerPoint presentations are decks of death for the poor souls who have to view them. Many consultants see the creation of these presentations as their core work output. This misses the point! The key responsibility of a consultant is to offer clear, timely advice and help an organization implement it as quickly and efficiently as possible for the best business results. Smart people like Garr Reynolds of Presentation Zen, Guy Kawasaki, Dan and Chip Heath and Seth Godin all argue for the simplification of business communication.You should take this advice from me with a huge caveat however: following it will make you a better consultant but may get you fired. Much of the business world is not ready for this shift yet. So follow it at your own peril, knowing that a decade or so from now, it will be the “in” thing.
  3. Thinking you know everything. A good consultant exhibits two behaviors: a constant focus on learning and an open, receptive and questioning attitude.Instead of walking in the door and saying “Here is what you should do,” step back and ask a lot of questions.“What do you do?” “Why do you do it?” “How does it benefit you?” “What gets in your way?” “What are you trying to accomplish?”No matter how many different scenarios you are exposed to, none is exactly the same and you should always learn as much as you can about the company you are working with before jumping to recommendations.
  4. Acting like a clone. My best friend Desiree, who used to work at both IBM and Accenture, would laugh with me at the “uniforms” we saw on young consultants.I don’t know if there was anything explicitly written in corporate policy, but everyone at Accenture seemed to wear the same black pants (or skirt) and purple-blue button-down collared shirt.What the outfit screamed was “no personality” and “member of consultant flock of sheep.”It made it easy for employees to spot them coming down the hall. Dress appropriately, but exhibit some personality.And don’t always cluster with fellow consultants like a high school clique at the cafeteria.Aim to mix with as many people as you can in your client organization:employees, other consultants from different firms, executives and rank and file service workers.
  5. Tying yourself to the coattails of one client. Generally, consultants are brought into an organization and sponsored by a key manager or executive.But you have to be careful to not be seen as “Suzy or Bob’s consultant.” Organizational politics and swift and brutal.If your sponsor is laid off, reassigned or quits, your head will be chopped very quickly.A better strategy is to get to know as many people as you can (per the point above) and build multiple strong relationships with those that hold the purse strings.

I hope this primer has been useful to those of you considering consulting as a career path. I would love to hear your thoughts, challenges and questions here in the comments section!

Pamela Slim is a recovering management consultant who now helps corporate employees leave their jobs to start their own business.She writes at www.escapefromcubiclenation.com and has a book of the same name coming out in Spring 2009 by Penguin Portfolio/Berkely.

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50 Comments on "Considering a career in consulting? Avoid these 5 stupid mistakes"

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7million7years
8 years 6 months ago
I feel that the biggest mistake that aspiring consultants make (particularly those setting up as an independent consultant/speaker) is to OVER-ESTIMATE their earning potential. On my blog I recently posted about a friend of mine, having sold out of his own business recently, who decided to become a consultant to his particular industry … his earning expectation is $200k for his second year in the business. I told him “it won’t happen” … Why? You have to apply the ‘smell test’ to these sorts of expectations … wouldn’t EVERYBODY leave their $100k a year jobs if you could suddenly earn… Read more »
Pamela Slim
8 years 6 months ago

Great point 7mil … it definitely can take time to build up a biz. It does depend on the business you are in, their propensity for using consultants, average hourly rates, etc.

It also depends on your mix of services. If you ONLY have hourly consulting in you biz model, you may run yourself ragged. That is why it is a good idea to also mix in some information products, or group seminars or teleclasses, etc.

Realism is so important in the planning process! Thanks for the good reminder.

JM
JM
8 years 6 months ago

Consulting is a great way to begin any career. Interesting article. Being in the IT consulting field I would like to point out a few important ‘advantages’ to consulting – the scale of learning be it skill wise or bureaucracy is steep, skills have to be kept current and wide and learn to network. Network maketh the consultant!

Jason Shen
8 years 6 months ago

Thanks for posting about this! I’ve been very interested to hear IWTYTBR’s take on consulting for a while – you hear so much bad stuff about it that you wonder if there is any good – and it looks like there is.

Kevin Gao
Kevin Gao
8 years 6 months ago

Hey Ramit – great article. One quick technical point – there’s a big difference between the Big 4 accounting firms (e.g., PWC, Ernst & Young, etc) and the generally considered 3 big management consulting firms (e.g, McKinsey, Bain, BCG). Both groups work with Fortune 500s on large, complex, generally more long-term internationally oriented projects, but the type of work can be very different, with the accounting firms focusing more closely on operations and finance, and the management consulting firms focusing on strategy, marketing, etc.

David
David
8 years 6 months ago
Working for a big 5 firm does have other advantages. You can get matched 401K, employee share purchase plans, great health benefits, perks (frequent flyer miles, hotel points, free car rentals, per diem, gas reimbursements, flex trips, etc.), all sorts of free stuff. Basically, you can always make a good living. It’s a great way to save money and avoid other typical costs. I haven’t had to work any ungodly hours, yet, but that’s because I’m very careful about what I choose to do. They are trying more and more to cater to the out of college folks with the… Read more »
Pamela Slim
8 years 6 months ago

Thanks for the great comments — good clarifications.

And since Ramit didn’t put a “guest post” intro on this one like he did others (probably was in the throes of packing for his trip!), I just want to make sure you know that I have the blame for authoring this article, not Ramit! Ten years ago, he would have been a lad of 16. 🙂

-Pam
Escape from Cubicle Nation

Pamela Slim
8 years 6 months ago

Thanks Jeff!

So true on Ramit consulting since 16.. the little punk makes old ladies like me look like total slackers. 🙂

Rich
Rich
8 years 6 months ago
I’d say this post is pretty much spot-on. I recently left a small consulting firm (first job out of college) to join one of the Goliath’s mentioned above and find almost every point to be valid. One point you don’t want to minimize, and which pertains to the larger firms at least is the (lack of) work/life balance. As David said above, recruiters and HR people are trying to emphasize it, but I don’t necessarily see a whole lot of balance where the rubber meets the road. David already noted the travel, but I think it’s worth repeating; at an… Read more »
airportlurker
8 years 6 months ago

I highly recommend checking out Getting Drunk in First Class for more information on the real deal of consulting life. Obviously, a humor-favored site, to be sure.

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[…] in consulting? Avoid these 5 stupid mistakes Written by on March 10, 2008 – 2:54 pm – Another fellow blogger created an interesting post today on Considering a career in consulting? Avoid these 5 stupid […]

Mario Sanchez
8 years 6 months ago
Hi Pam: What you write is also very applicable to corporate guys who work at an international level. Going to a division of the company in another country often presents us with the same challenges and situations as those of a consultant starting a new gig. The first three mistakes that you mention are very relevant. I know several people who have burned their bridges by making one or all three of these mistakes. The key is to remain humble, treat people with respect and when time comes to give your recommendations, do it in a way that is firm… Read more »
Beatrice
Beatrice
8 years 6 months ago

I think I saw the mention of ‘fee’ somewhere in the comments. Here is link to an article I found very useful to better understand how to set a consulting fee.
http://www.consultantjournal.com/blog/setting-consulting-fee-rates

ideapreneur
8 years 6 months ago

This couldn’t have come up at a more perfect time for me, I never really understood the management style and the corporate culture for the Big 5. I had to learn the hard way, but it’s definitely a great experience overall.

Thanks for the post!

VBM
VBM
8 years 6 months ago

A quick question for people in the consulting right now.

For companies like Accenture, McKinsey – what are the starting salaries like? I have one year of work experience at an Investment Bank but have always wanted to do consulting. Can anyone specify the sort of starting salary and other perks? What is per diem ($ wise). Would really appreciate it.

David
David
8 years 6 months ago
VBM, I went into consulting as a college graduate, and from my understanding, pay depends on a few things: the school you went to, your home location, your degree, and the type of consulting you went into (IT, Business, etc.). I’m not clear as to how it works for an experienced higher, however. If you went to any Ivy League school, had an engineering degree, and worked in NYC, you’d get a higher pay to accommodate you for the standards of living. I would guess the starting salaries at most big firms is at least ~50k-60k/year depending on those factors… Read more »
Irish Elvis
Irish Elvis
8 years 6 months ago

One nit: John Legend was a consultant at BCG (Boston Consulting Group) prior to his musical career. Accordingly, BCG has been known to include a John Legend CD in their welcome pack for new hires.

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[…] Full article – Via : ©iwillteachyoutoberich.com Published by admin Tips career, consultant, mistakes, self-employed […]

VBM
VBM
8 years 6 months ago

David,

Thanks a lot for your very detailed response. I went to Penn State and would be interested in Business or Finance type of consulting.

This will definitely help me a lot in making a decision.

Again thanks a lot.

Consultant
Consultant
8 years 6 months ago
Hi VBM, I can’t give you my e-mail on here for fear of spam, but I can tell you what to expect as my firm recruits from Penn State. We also do business, finance, and IT consulting. We are a not a boutique firm nor a big 4, but have several engagements where we work with PwC, KPMG, Accenture, etc. I work in Philadelphia and most big cities we get $64 per diem a day and starting salaries are around $55K. If you have one year of experience you may see ~$60K but it depends how relevant your skills are.… Read more »
Pamela Slim
8 years 6 months ago

Great contributions everyone!

I really appreciate the specifics on salaries/per diems etc since I have no idea, never having worked for the larger consulting companies.

And Irish thanks so much for the correction on John Legend … I should have double checked that fact!

jeffkuo – would you mind correcting that in the main article?

Thanks!
-Pam

Brip Blap
8 years 6 months ago
Interesting article – I was actually drawn in by the “boo-boo” on the Big 5 that Kevin Gao mentioned – I was going to comment on that, being a former Big-6-er pre PW-Coopers merger and pre-AA implosion. I’m a former PwC and Deloitte alum, and I can tell anyone that the hours are horrendous, the stress is impossible, the pay sucks until you hit partner and the experience is tremendous. I soaked all I could out of the experience and then jumped ship and haven’t looked back. If you go into consulting hoping to be rich chances are good you… Read more »
VBM105
VBM105
8 years 6 months ago

Consultant,

Thanks a lot. I really appreciate the input. I will definitely keep all of this in mind.

VBM

Rana
Rana
8 years 6 months ago

Great article!! I have been a nurse for 14 years and am now considering going into healthcare consulting. I will finish my MBA in a couple of months. Any advice for just how to get a foot in the door?

Pam
Pam
9 months 28 days ago
You hit the nail on the head perfectly. I joined the Consulting world after raising a family and in a field totally contrary to my degree. Started with a Big 5 firm, however, because of the locality rules (requirement that the employee lives in a city where there is an office – sucks), I moved to a much smaller firm. I have welcomed the opportunity to grow and learn in various industries and the individuals from other countries and settings. Also, I get bored easily so the variety keeps me motivated. I do not regret my decision because unlike a… Read more »
Pamela Slim
8 years 6 months ago
A couple of thoughts Rana … I would keep tight with former colleagues and bosses and see if anyone can open a door for you at their place of employment. My first consulting gig was for my former boss, who went to a new company. I would also try to connect and network with existing successful healthcare consultants. Perhaps there is someone really busy who could use some help on a project. That is a great way to get exposure to the market without having to do all the sales and marketing yourself. Just make sure you don’t elbow in… Read more »
Pam
Pam
9 months 28 days ago

Huron Consulting has a strong Healthcare Practice.

Barbara Saunders
8 years 6 months ago
This article leaves out one kind of consulting that can be lucrative and satisfying for the right person — consulting to nonprofits, especially community-based organizations. A dirty little secret I’ve learned about this niche: Many NPOs have never created the independent contributor track. Positions that (in my opinion) should be staff positions are given to consultants. An example: a good friend of mine is a consultant for a nonprofit agency that matches volunteers who give support to women fighting life-threatening illnesses. Her job is screening, training, and assigning volunteers. It would seem that the best solution for this responsibility would… Read more »
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[…] Considering a career in consulting? Avoid these 5 stupid mistakes | I Will Teach You To Be Rich (tags: toread work consulting advice career) […]

Rich B.
Rich B.
7 years 8 months ago

As long as you’re working for someone ELSE…you’ll always be in the discontent. I can’t wait to kiss IBM consulting GOOD BYE! The hours are ridiculously long (sbsolutely NO work/life balance) and the pay is GARBAGE. I can thank IBM for reinforcing the fact that I CANNOT spend the rest of my working life stuck in the rat race! I’m starting my own business.

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[…] Considering a career in consulting? Avoid these 5 stupid mistakes – from Ramit’s blog. A few factual errors but points well made […]

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6 years 9 months ago

[…] have been revealed. Well, sorta (hat tip: A. […]

Troy Breialnd
1 year 1 month ago

Great article. While consulting can provide excellent opportunities for ambitious individuals, it’s not for everyone. After a few years of intense travel, the perks of seeing the world, making great money, and meeting interesting people can get a bit old. If you enjoy the thrill of learning new things and meeting interesting people, but hate the travel – consider joining an Expert Network to share your knowledge, network with interesting people, and make a few bucks. I’ve put together a comprehensive list of networks at theexpertnetworks.com.

John Boland
John Boland
1 year 7 days ago

Great article. I am in the process of selling my stake in a start up eCommerce company I co founded 3 years ago. Consultancy has always interested me as a role but I find that looking at some job spec’s I wouldn’t have the necessary experience they need to gain an entry position. I currently have a degree and MBA in business related subjects and just wondered if any of you could advise me on what would be the best route to enter this industry. Thanks

Shikha
Shikha
1 year 6 days ago

Hi, thank you for the article – quite educating. I have a question – I am a business research professional, with 5.5 years of experience. Have worked on several simple research and consulting projects across sectors and across functions (procurement, M&A, market entry, growth strategy, etc.). I am an MBA from a Tier II Indian college, and before that I did B.Sc. (Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics). I aspire to become a business consultant. What skills should I try to acquire/ what additional qualification should I pursue to fulfil this dream. Thanks in anticipation.

crew2015
9 months 23 days ago

Nice article shre with us, now a days human resource management plays very important role in all most all companies so many events also conducting regarding this human resource like in Hyderabad ” CORPORATE RECRUITMENT WINDOW FOR CORPORATE HRS. & CONSULTANTS” called Crew2015 on this December 3rd 2015 , any one interested feel free to register and for more details visit the website http://crew2015.com/

Jennifer Mackey
8 months 10 days ago

Great article….I will definitely keep all of this in mind.

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[…] front they value candidates with ambition, excellent presentation skills, confidence and good people skills. Good knowledge of packages such as Excel (and also Powerpoint) also tend to come in […]

Michelle Garcia
Michelle Garcia
6 months 14 days ago

Interesting article…..Consulting is a great way to begin any career.
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job consultancies in hyderabad
4 months 12 hours ago

I am impressed, its useful to all people thanks for this sharing for us and its interesting article, i got best information and best service from your blog, i am very glad to wish and sure its very helps

Ramona Vandusen
3 months 10 days ago

Great article about consulting career. Consulting is a one of the best way to start any career.

Alberto
Alberto
3 months 12 hours ago

Does anyone know how to get your foot in the door for a consulting job? It seems like many of these firms are looking for experienced individuals.

Asphire
2 months 10 days ago

It’s a nice article, i am improving my mistakes by reading these type of good articles. Thanks.

sergetechnologies
sergetechnologies
1 month 23 days ago

wow very interesting. Best useful blog forever & very thanks for written the post. See for more consulting at http://www.sergetechnologies.com/

Mike Adams
Mike Adams
30 days 11 hours ago

Going with consulting services is the only way to begin career in good direction. Thanks for the nice blog. I would advice to visit I Living My Purpose for purpose for more information on the real deal of consulting life.

A French lost in Japan
A French lost in Japan
16 days 19 hours ago
Thank you for posting this. Since I just left my country (France) and I am currently applying for several big consulting companies such as accenture, I was firstly wondering if I do have the needed skills to become a consultant. As of my Master degrees of Business, I have been working to several places in Europe during 3 years (Diagnosis ingineer for Benz in the Netherlands, Logistics client coordinator for a Japanese logistics company in Paris, etc…) As you may see, my career path is still blurry as I did diverse jobs trying to figure out what would match me… Read more »
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[…] make use of these data, a lot of resources are needed to sift it. To be competitive, therefore, IT consulting firms must be ready parse data of any magnitude into useful and manageable reports for their […]

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