Get my 5-day email funnel that generated $400,000 from a single launch

Want an email sales funnel that's already proven to work? Get the entire word-for-word email funnel that generated $400,000 from a single launch and apply it to your own business.

Yes! Send me the funnel now
15 Little Life Hacks

The best IWT posts of 2013

33 Comments- Get free updates of new posts here

7 2

Back in January, I wrote that 2013 was the year of taking control.

I’m not big on New Year’s resolutions, but this year I gave myself two things to change:

    1. Have difficult conversations earlier
    2. See a movie alone (I hate doing anything alone, especially eating or seeing a movie)

Result: SUCCESS. I saw a movie alone, even though it took me until November, and I’m slowly getting better at having tough conversations without letting them fester for 32 years.

Together, this year we took control of our finances, our careers, and our behavior.

Here are the best posts of 2013!

There are hundreds of emails I wrote that I never release here. If you’re curious, you can join 200,000+ other people on my private email list.

Thanks for reading and being the best community anywhere.

And I can’t wait to share even more with you in 2014. Here’s a hint: I’ll be releasing material on my #1-requested topic from the last 5 years.

By the way, what was your biggest insight of this year? And what’s one thing you want me to share next year?

7 2

Related Articles

performanceeval

How to crush your performance improvement plan

There are two types of people who stumble onto this page. Either you love your job and hope to crush ...

Read More
performance

How to turn negative performance review phrases into a 30%+ raise

Here’s a dirty secret about performance reviews your HR department doesn’t want you to know. Any performance review, ...

Read More

33 Comments

7 2
 
  1. […] The best IWT posts of 2013 is a post from: I Will Teach You To Be Rich. […]

  2. Ramit.. really nice collection of your best of 2013… i however, tend to disagree on one point.. i.e. looking for the market to test the idea.. to answer the question of whether to be obsessed with the idea and balancing it with the market demand is quite tricky.. quite a times, many giant businesses created the markets rather than following the market. I can quote you the example of Air BnB.. they almost created a new niche market while focusing on the macro view of the housing market for rent…
    secondly when we talk about the idea we must not forget that ideas alone cannot be good until we also have the relevant exposure to the market so it is quite tricky i believe..

  3. Since social media is very important to us now, I’m not sure how long will it last as a powerful method of marketing. What do you think is the next big buzz in marketing Ramit?

  4. The link to the real estate myth post reminded me of something that I thought Ramit left out of the calculation (I read the post a week later and the comment thread was mostly over).

    A big problem with buying a house (to live in) as an investment, is that if you do luck out and get soaring returns…those returns are mostly unrealized (you can get a home equity loan or something, but to realize the full returns, you need to sell).
    Because prices tend to move on a neighborhood or regional basis, it becomes very difficult to realize those returns without dumping them back into another house.

    For example, lets say you buy a house in a neighborhood that is on the rise where the average selling price is $250k. 5 years later, the reputation for cool shops/restaurants and good schools (plus a general recovery of the real estate market) means that homes in your area are now selling for 500k. That’s great news because you have doubled your money right? If you sell now, you have only made 5 years of interest payments but have gained an extra 250k in equity so you have tremendous returns thanks to leverage.
    This sounds great until you think about where you are going to live when you sell. You like your neighborhood and your kids like their school. You can sell your house to realize your gains, but every other house in the neighborhood has experienced the same rate of appreciation. So now you might get that 250k in your pocket, but you are either going to have to roll it into the price of another 500k home or move somewhere cheaper and decrease your standard of living.

    The value of something is only what someone is willing to pay for it. At least with a stock or fund, you can take the gains in one sector and invest them into some other sector without upsetting your life. To do the same thing with your home, you have to keep moving into undervalued/developing areas (and since you have zero diversification, you have to get this gamble right every time).

  5. Good post Ramit. I am curious….what film did you go see alone?

  6. My biggest insight of the year is that it’s ok to be myself and I am the only one responsible for my well-being, so I should stop looking for approval from others and start being more assertive and confident. I’ve been browsing personal development blogs for 3-4 years, but only now did this really sink in. One of the things that helped shape my new outlook on life is your Success Triggers program, so thanks a lot for putting it together! I still have a lot of challenges ahead, especially in the social/networking and career development areas, but I feel like I have a strong foundation from which to tackle them.

  7. Marko Graenitz Link to this comment

    Thanks for all your posts this year Ramit. My insight of the year: PROCESS is key!

  8. Hi Ramit

    I only discovered you at the end of 2013 but I am really enjoying your blog and I’m looking forward to reading more in 2014.

    I still remember the first film I went to on my own – it was a nerve wracking experience but after a while I found it became one of my occasional favourite treats for myself – just to escape everyone else and immerse myself in the film without the need for conversation or sharing the popcorn.

  9. Hey Ramit! I am an old lady (by your way of measuring) and I absolutely LOVE your site! I made a mid-life career change as my job went overseas. It was an incredibly tough transition as I was competing with people younger and with more education….but I kept at my goal and tweaked and adjusted and asked for feedback and took classes and made cold calls and warm calls and whatever I had to do until I finally got my Dream Job this last year. I love how you don’t sugar-coat the truth, which makes change SO MUCH EASIER than trying to (re)build a life based on BS. My insight? DON’T QUIT.

  10. The biggest insight I’ve hard this year is “trust the system”. Second to that, I’ve realized that it’s supposed to be hard. Last year around this time, as a college junior at a highly competitive liberal arts school, I made the decision that I would go into the entertainment industry, which is a notoriously competitive field. This required learning how to become a top performer. The funny thing was that I’d used all available resources at my school, from the alumni network to the career center. And by all accounts, I looked like a success story to everyone around me.

    But I knew I wasn’t yet equipped to actually carry out my creative vision. Despite my best efforts, I couldn’t quite make my daily life look like how I knew it should. Through some trial and error, I started making incremental changes, reviewing my organizational tools and consciously shaping my habits. I started seeing some results but I found myself not quite achieving my benchmarks.

    As I go into next year, it’s all coalesced into the realization that I have to “work the system” in order to build the life I want. Success is entirely dependent on how you approach systems & processes.

    “It’s supposed to be hard. But if you can do it — if you can acknowledge your psychological barriers, build systems to help you become successful, and surround yourself with winners who will challenge you to do more — you can reap the truly disproportionate rewards of being the best.”

    For next year, I’d love to see you share more examples of how you approach systems and processes in your own life, particularly when it comes to psychological barriers about your own ability. Did you ever doubt a specific capability or skill set that would become essential to your success? How did you improve it?

    Thank you for posting really fantastic material and inspiring us all to live a rich life!

*