How to apply the 80/20 rule to earn more, work less, and dominate

Today, learn how to apply the 80/20 rule to eliminate meaningless work from your life -- and focus on what really matters -- to earn more, work less, and spend time doing the things you love. Below, you'll learn... How to work 2 fewer hours/day How to double your salary (at age 26) How to take a $12,...

Why personal finance “experts” continue giving worthless advice

Today, I'll share a behavioral-change technique that's helped me create a New York Times best-selling book, a blog that's been read by millions of people, and a course on earning money that has helped my students earn hundreds of thousands of dollars on the side. In 1954, researchers Hastorf and Cantril published a seminal study in The Journal of Abnormal ...

Can anyone spot what’s wrong with this Wall St Journal article?

I love the Wall Street Journal, but as I was browsing it yesterday, I found this page. Who can identify what's wrong with it? Why might this be a sub-optimal way to talk about personal finance? What does the typical reader think when he sees this page? Hint: It took me about 4 years to figure this out. [Edit]: The ...

Rebalancing & asset allocation: critical for investing. So why don’t you do it?

As you know, I love mocking people who believe that we are "rational" and "logical." These tend to be economists, engineers, and other people who are clueless about human behavior. One of the best ways to reveal the difference between what rational people "should" do and what real people actually do is to talk about rebalancing and asset allocation. Today, ...

My Free Insider's Kit will show you how to earn more money

Psychology of Money: The Last Mile of Saving

A few weeks ago, while I was at a conference in DC, I was attending a panel on email marketing when someone raised their hand and asked a question about advertisers and CPM vs. CPA. If you've ever been to a tech conference and waited for the Q&A period, this is about when you start contemplating different ways ...

The Beardstown Ladies

People are cognitively very, very bad at taking all costs into account when calculating investment returns. In one haunting example from a New York Times article on real estate, one investor illustrates this perfectly: By comparison, he views the four-bedroom home he bought for $32,500 in 1965 - or about $200,000 in today's dollars - as a money ...