Get my 5-day email funnel that generated $400,000 from a single launch

Want an email sales funnel that's already proven to work? Get the entire word-for-word email funnel that generated $400,000 from a single launch and apply it to your own business.

Yes! Send me the funnel now
Credit Card Debt Calculator”

Be the Expert: Spot the delusions in this real-estate ad

55 Comments- Get free updates of new posts here

1 0

This is a “luxury real estate” newsletter I get every month. See how many logical disconnects/delusions you can spot in the copy.

Real Estate Delusion

Leave a comment with your findings.

Read more “Be the Expert” posts.

1 0

Related Articles

Untitled design (6)

How to pay off student loans without thinking about it

Student loans are a big kick in the face that the real world has arrived. The average graduate has $28,...

Read More
stretching

The 4 keys to finding ambition

We’re told we should just be happy with what we have… but there’s a difference between being happy ...

Read More

55 Comments

1 0
 

Leave a Reply

55 Comments on "Be the Expert: Spot the delusions in this real-estate ad"

Notify of
avatar

Rissa
Rissa
5 years 4 months ago
well, just after a brief skim, the first thing i noticed was the pressing URGENCY to do something before other people steal your opportunity, or inflation kicks in *for real*; the message is that if you don’t you’ll suffer. second thing i noticed was the claim that Manhattan is devoid of property to buy (the implication there being that even the wealthy will have a hard time purchasing something they’d like). there’s no citations or evidence of any of the claims in this, only vague mentions of what the “buyers” are seeing/feeling (who? which buyers? where did you get this… Read more »
Marguerite
Marguerite
5 years 4 months ago
Where to start: really, the first quarter began with a vengeance? Numerous contracts, many places, multiple bidders (or *interested parties*). Sad, disillusioned. Homeless wealthy? Dismal selection (and there is a gripe about it), better act NOW NOW, there are never bargains on good apartments, act now and bid high!, price escalation is starting (in someone’s mind, but not really), no one bargains (except Ramit…), there’s nothing new right now (and you need NEW), and you need chic lobbies and common areas (despite not hanging out in them), nothing meets your needs, you can’t afford it…BUY NOW, don’t think just buy,… Read more »
Brent
5 years 4 months ago

Blam! Walloftext WTFpwns you for 99999999 damage.
You die.

No, but really, did they try to eliminate all the whitespace from the text in their ad? Also, 1 room with a gigantic mirror screams “not a home!” This is the “formal” living room and looks anything but welcoming. Sorry, I didn’t read the text.

Whitney
Whitney
5 years 4 months ago

White space is overrated. Turns out, emptiness doesn’t sell.

Brent
5 years 4 months ago

Okay, sorry, another comment after I read it. “Inflation is on the horizon”? No shit? Of course it’s going to go up as it’s been near zero/negative for the past while. This just in: “The sky predicted to be blue in the near future!”

Sterling
Sterling
5 years 4 months ago
Manhattan is “home to the homeless wealthy”? Nice paradox. “dismal selection of great properties” “FEELING the beginnings of price escalation” – didn’t that begin at least 40 years ago in Manhattan? How, over time, can bids rise and asking prices not? If the bids are higher than the asking price, then why would the selling price be lower than the bidding price? if the “remaining units are not what [buyers] need or can afford”, then why would they “pick a unit and be done with it”? “the perfect apartment is not out there” – WTF? According to whom? What are… Read more »
Whitney
Whitney
5 years 4 months ago
#1. (Logical Disconnect) : “Numerous contracts signed on many great properties” means that wealthy buyers ARE finding properties, and that there isn’t a “dismal selection.” What the hell is there to be “saddened and disillusioned” about? #2. (Delusion) New York was in no way exempt from the recession. I know that and I’ve never been there and don’t know a single person who lives there. Their assumption that “bargains hardly ever happen on the best apartments in a city like New York” is ignorant. #3. (Logical Disconnect) How the hell do you “feel” price escalation without actually seeing asking prices… Read more »
Evan
Evan
5 years 4 months ago

I realize they were shooting to create urgency – but I just found it a downer and was annoyed at the end-instead of motivated to jump over to their website and “register for the fight”.

Lynn
Lynn
5 years 4 months ago

Beside what the first 2 said…

Buy any crappy thing now while you can AND pay a much higher tax assessment while you’re at it.

Adam
Adam
5 years 4 months ago

That was what jumped out at me. Hurry up and spend a bunch of money on an apartment, and oh by the way, your taxes just went through the roof.

patrick
patrick
5 years 4 months ago
Ramit, this letter is ridiculous. why do you subscribe to this trash? i hope it’s only for our amusement. I only bothered to deconstruct the first paragraph below, and even then I could’ve taken it further.I can’t believe some people think this is credible. First paragraph: ‘as predicted’ Who predicted, exactly? and when? and why should I care? and why are they credible? ‘the first quarter has begun with a vengeance’ compared to what? and avenging what exactly? and isn’t the first quarter always generally better in real estate than the winter quarter? I’m sure the summer quarter will begin… Read more »
Andrew Lynch
5 years 4 months ago
I think Whitney spotted a lot of them, so I’m trying to find stuff she didn’t mention. If there have been “numerous contracts signed on many great properties”, how can the buyers be “saddened and disillusioned”? Do they not like the great house they’ve just bought? There are a lot of weasel words (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weasel_word) like “as predicted” (by whom?), “this seems to be”, (according to whom?) and the constant use of “buyers” without specifying which particular buyers – are we talking about first-time buyers, families, young professionals, retirees? There is a total lack of precision in terms, which is used… Read more »
Helen
Helen
5 years 4 months ago
The whole article is based on false beliefs, guesses and assumptions (dismal selection of properties, halt for 2 years on new building, no bargains) Most sentences create meaningless links between two subjects (Logical disconnect). For example, “Wealthy are Homeless”. Not being able to get a new property doesn’t make you homeless, losing your current one does. If the wealthy are not able to buy a new property, then who ARE the buyers of the available decent properties? Is it the bargain hunters that are quick and get a low offer accepted quickly? Or is there a new level of wealth… Read more »
Cukamunger
Cukamunger
5 years 4 months ago
I think the biggest delusion is that there is any real estate open on the Manhattan market that isn’t freakishly expensive. Don’t people search the obituaries just to see if a dilapidated apartment lease might be available? Wasn’t that a big theme in the movie, “Sex in the City”? Second biggest delusion, people want to read a dissertation under a pretty photo. It was impossible for me not to skip to the purple box at the end and become disinterested. When I went back to read it, all I could think was “The end is coming!!! Stupid people of the… Read more »
Dan Barrett
5 years 4 months ago

YOU GUYS! You guys. Please, stop nitpicking this ad, and focus on the real problem:

WHEN IS OUR GOVERNMENT GOING TO STEP UP AND DO SOMETHING TO HELP THE HOMELESS WEALTHY?

Paul
Paul
5 years 4 months ago

nice

Victoria
Victoria
5 years 4 months ago
The photo shows a spare, clean apartment. Good start. Then the whole writing part devolves into some kind of depressing doomsday real estate prediction, ending with an urging of pick what you can find or forget about it. Are these people trying to sell something, because if so, this is the worst sell ever. They list a number of problems with no desirable solutions. I am not looking to a real estate newsletter for economic predictions. Why don’t they tell us the wheres and hows of the people who were SUCCESSFUL in their search for a home? Tell us what… Read more »
J.R.C.
J.R.C.
5 years 4 months ago
Yup, the article at a glance looks like it is either delusional or offers no value. But instead of picking apart all the many reasons it’s silly, I am going to continue to focus on getting my wife and I access to each other’s Roth IRAs so we can hurry up and make our 2011 contributions. (Did you know to do this in North Carolina for Merrill Edge accounts you need to grant each other ‘durable power of attorney’ and it has to be notarized? Oh the hoops that need to be jumped through. No wonder ordinary people don’t do… Read more »
Tom
5 years 4 months ago

My main gripe with it was …

I started to read it, and got bored a quarter of the way through. I am a reader, so people who aren’t big readers would likely have less staying power on it.

It’s boring to read.

Matt M
Matt M
5 years 4 months ago
Everything about this ad is terrible: Is the picture related to the ad? Is this a “signed contract” building, was it sold quickly to a high bidder, or is it just a pretty picture to get you to read the manifesto? The numbered list doesn’t sum up the point. 1) A very dismal selection of great properties to choose from: this seems to be a constant gripe better copy: 1) Great properties are rare! This is our buyers’ most frequent complaint. Ok, great. Now WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO ABOUT IT!? This ad/article identifies problems (poorly and vaguely), but… Read more »
robert
robert
5 years 4 months ago

One disconnects/delusions:
Asking price not risen…. And Selling price closer to asking price….
Assessment are up 60%.

This is a losing deal in paying for these properties.

Jonathan Vaudreuil
5 years 4 months ago
“As predicted, the first quarter has begun with a vengeance…” vengeance – noun Infliction of injury, harm, humiliation, or the like, on a person by another who has been harmed by that person; violent revenge. – idiom: with a vengeance With force or violence; greatly; extremely; to an unreasonable, surprising, or excessive degree. I’m not sure which is worse: suggesting that the beginning of 2011 is inflicting pain upon the rich people whose violent actions towards old calendars brought agony upon the earliest days of January; or the idea that newsletter writers unleashed their inner Nostradamus and predicted something so… Read more »
Armon
Armon
5 years 4 months ago

The thing is… they will actually sell units with this newsletter pitch.

Perfect Dad
5 years 4 months ago
Here is the main disconnect: They claim they are advertising to the wealthy, but really they are advertising to the stupid. You are not their target market Their target is New Yorkers with two digit IQs and seven digit bank accounts. Very specific – Bravo! Probably the spoiled and wasted grown children of real successful people, maybe folks with big inheritances, ex-spouses that won good settlements, young royalty from other countries, lottery winners, etc. You couldn’t sell with this to a Trump or a Sethi, but I know many poor, risk averse, analytically challenged, fear-driven and gullible people who would… Read more »
Eric S. Mueller
5 years 4 months ago

That thing reads like a time share sales pitch. “Oh, no, if I don’t drop $50,000 RIGHT NOW I’ll never be able to vacation in Williamsburg AGAIN! EVER! Must do it now, whether I can afford it or not!”

Are wealthy people really that impulsive and easily swayed? I’d assume many of them are wealthy because they don’t succumb to the emotional reactions of the middle class when confronted with copy like that.

Michelle Shain
5 years 4 months ago

The biggest delusion I see is that the writer seems to think I give a crap about how some nameless, faceless buyers are FEELING. Like their emotional states have any bearing on my real estate decisions.

Derek
5 years 4 months ago

I think all the major points have been covered, the copy focus is on scacety (with no real proof) and a call to action to get something (anything) quickly, but I don’t see who I’m supposed to contact when I take action. I guess this might be the cover and I should contact the agents for properties inside the booklet.

Also, I just hate the look of the room. Everything lined up square with the walls, no angles, very sterile.

Steve
Steve
5 years 4 months ago

The many problems with the copy and design of the ad distract from the big lie: that you must BUY NOW. While I’m certainly not part of the “homeless rich,” I would rather pay a set rent than speculate in the high-risk and often low-yielding real estate market.

Rebecca
Rebecca
5 years 4 months ago
I’m with Brent, can this “luxury” newsletter not afford a designer who knows how to lay out an article with white space? The article looks like the fine print on a contract! Nor, apparently, can they afford a real copywriter. “A very dismal selection of great properties to choose from; this seems to be a consistent gripe” is so bad it makes the leprechauns in my head tell me to BURN THINGS. I’m not sure if this is logical disconnect or bad writing or both, but I wonder how people will be doomed to pay more for a perfect apartment… Read more »
Addy B
Addy B
5 years 4 months ago

I can’t believe this is real. Ramit, have you doctored this newsletter for fun?

Otherwise…just wow.

Formula = Let’s raise every irrational anxiety we can think in the next of and then offer a pretty vague solution for umm ….something.

What incentive does this newsletter have to take such a distracted approach? Does this work? ((I’m so naive))

Addy B
Addy B
5 years 4 months ago

oops * think of in the next 5 mins and then…

Karen
5 years 4 months ago

Did Woody Allen write this ad? Is this a New York kind of thing?! Anxiety…Depression…then throw down $$$$ and acquiesce to it all. I’m in real estate, and I could never imagine an ad like that where I live.

Norbert
Norbert
5 years 4 months ago
Well first they use the first technique in every realator’s handbook: Scaring people into making a quick decision by telling them that they have competition i.e. other people interested in buying. They also try to get into the person’s head by listing different reasons some people don’t/haven’t went through with it yet. Once they’re in your head and you get to trust them they convince you that there is no “perfect” apartment and that you should settle for what you can find. There are perfect apartments, everyone just has a different definition. To someone living on a street a perfect… Read more »
Lee
Lee
5 years 4 months ago
In addition to the many delusions already pointed out, this ad is waste of money on the part of whatever real estate agency paid for it because its basic message that you shouldn’t use their service. For a company in the business of making commissions by selling apartments, it is stupid for them to point out how impossible it will be to find a place I will like, and how I might as well give up and rent. That doesn’t give me an incentive to hire them or look at their listings. Tell me what you will do for me… Read more »
Tom
5 years 4 months ago

Definitely attacking people’s feelings of vulnerability.

Mady
Mady
5 years 4 months ago

I have found that it is almost impossible to predict the market. I was so surprise that even in the weeks preceding the big housing bubble burst hardly anyone figured it out it would happen.

There is no data backing out their claims.

AD
AD
5 years 4 months ago

“The Homeless Wealthy” wouldn’t resonate with the target audience because they’re not homeless. You’re buying, maybe looking for a new home, but you’re not homeless.

I didn’t bother reading the rest of it. I imagine they wouldn’t either.

Josh Moore
5 years 4 months ago
Hi Ramit, The first and most obvious one to me is simple. In the top right it shows the words “Luxury Letter” and then a picture of a nicely set out house. The implication is that only people who own a home have access to a luxurious lifestyle and layout within their home. In truth, people can rent any type of home, whether it is small, medium, large, furnished, unfurnished, etc. and can deck it out any way they like. Purchasing a house is still a consumer purchase, not a wise investment. People are irrational and buy on emotion rather… Read more »
Adam
Adam
5 years 4 months ago

“monthly luxury real estate newsletter”, that would be my first inclination that what I’m reading is a delusion

xmasy
xmasy
5 years 4 months ago

Are they telling you to buy or wait? Mixed messages!!
Because only home owners get tax assesment and they are saying its a 60% increase….so why buy!

AD
AD
5 years 4 months ago
I think the finer points I would mention have been covered already, but the biggest overall disconnect for me is that a real estate company is giving prospective buyers a dozen reasons why now is the worst time to buy or be an owner (taxes up 60%) in NY. I was in real estate for a year, and I saw how the good agents worked. One would pick her clients up in a limo and give them a fancy pen to sign their papers at closing, and this was for standard homes all under $300,000. She made the process simple… Read more »
Utsav
Utsav
5 years 4 months ago

To all the commenters criticizing the ad’s “scare tactics” – raising people’s fears on “missing out” is a perfectly legitimate (and effective) sales tactic. Perhaps you’ve even seen it on IWTYTBR…

Agree with Josh, the biggest delusion is the underlying assumption that buying is a good investment, which as Ramit has POINTED OUT A MILLION times, is often not the case

MoneyIsTheRoot
MoneyIsTheRoot
5 years 4 months ago
The scare tactics are similar to that of the credits offered by the federal government for purchasing a home the last couple years. First it was the 7.5K that was amortized and paid back over so many years, they told us it would never get better than that. Then came along the 8k credit free and clear. And now that those credits are gone, the market is still dropping, at least in the Metro Detroit area where I live. You could find a better deal now than before the tax credit expired…the only true benefit is to rebuild an emergency… Read more »
Afford-Anything.com
5 years 4 months ago
They have a sense of urgency — a tone that if you don’t ACT NOW (i.e. before you’ve had a chance to think it through, with a cool head), you’ll MISS OUT! Rule of thumb: whenever you hear that tone of urgency, you know someone’s probably trying to talk you into a bad idea. Otherwise, the seller would have the confidence to know that you could think about it all you want and still rationally arrive at the conclusion that they’re offering a great deal. This ad also preys on people’s fears … one of the oldest tricks in the… Read more »
mo
mo
5 years 4 months ago

there’s no contact information — i have no name, no email, no phone number to reference.

Nigel Chua
5 years 4 months ago

Yeah, come to think of it, that’s true. Maybe they’re trying to direct people to the link inked at the bottom: “www.nycdupe.com”? but it’s dead link (as of 17/3/2011 11:42 am Singapore time).

joseph
joseph
5 years 4 months ago

where’s the TV?

Nigel Chua
5 years 4 months ago
1) Firstly, the wealthy are not homeless. The ad was more focused on marketing to the emotions of the person who perceives they have wealth 2) Secondly, the “as predicted, the first quarter has begun with a vengeance…” starts with something that has disconnected/no meaning 3) Their great “advice” – look at everything quickly, pick a unit and be done with it. What a stupid advice. 4) It seems like an ad to invest in luxury properties…but at the bottom it points to nycdupe.com that is pointed to luxuryloft.com (think it’s a luxury real estate website) – another inconsistency. 5)… Read more »
Nigel Chua
5 years 4 months ago

More inconsistencies
1) the link to nycdupe.com is a dead link, on top of being forwarded to luxuryloft.com
2) I’m not exactly sure what is their real message (they’re not clear AT ALL)
3) number 5: the best units are sold, and the remaining units…are not those that they can afford. —????? what the hell? Unless the advertiser is stating that the best units are the cheapest ones, or the remaining ones are units that people shouldn’t afford…

Too many inconsistencies in this newsletter, thanks for bringing it up Ramit.

Evan
Evan
5 years 4 months ago

Honestly, I can barely get to the copy. From what angle did the photographer manage to get the whole room and at the same time depict the mirror reflecting the far left portion of the room? The photo alone creeps me out. Does this photo truly look normal to others?

Ray Johnson
Ray Johnson
5 years 4 months ago

The number one point that is most prevalent through this advertisement is the scare tactic . It’s like they are trying to scare you into purchasing a condo in NY or else you will be left out.

DunCAN
DunCAN
5 years 3 months ago

I wouldn’t be using this agent to sell my property.
If ‘stock’ is in such short supply, be positive and get a better price for your client!

It’s not rocket science, maybe I should move to NYC and bring Aussie spin to the real estate sales world there.

D

ps… not sure I could fit my 4 kids in a NYC loft/studio 😉

Ken Doyle
Ken Doyle
5 years 3 months ago

The main inconsistancy I see is not with the really bad copy, but with all the comments. all these opinions on what is wrong with it but no one wants to try to do the job of fixing it. I am not a great writer, but isn’t the point here to see a problem and go about creating a solution for it.

Miguel Gomez
5 years 3 months ago
I see some things that would need some revision: -Is it a newsletter or a sales pitch? Is it a sales pitch about buting a property I may not like (not the “perfect” apartment)? -For me, there’s a huge disconnect between urging you to buy an apartment and they telling about the outrageous tax assessments. If taxes are so high, why would I want to buy? -If there’s a “dismal selection” of great properties, why would I want to buy? -What is the call to action for this piece? To buy? To keep renting (even if I am a “wealthy… Read more »
Mike Toste (Lake Norman Mike)
While I as a real estate agent also market towards the luxury buyer, I think the major disconnect here is in implying that the wealthy and luxury buyer doesn’t get what he wants. To put it simply, yes they do. What would upset the wealthy reader in this is that the writer of said piece would dare insult the reader’s intelligence to say he must give up what he/she really wants and go for something quickly, all the while most anyone of any amount of wisdom knows never to make large purchases in a quick manner. (PS. I was able… Read more »
wpDiscuz